Coming Up for Air, or Life as a Tenured Professor

At least once a week, I make a notation in my notebook about a weekly blog post. I love having the space to work through ideas, to seem “less” academic, and to communicate quickly with folks (as opposed to waiting for the long slog of the publication cycle). Writing this is good for my soul,Continue reading “Coming Up for Air, or Life as a Tenured Professor”

It’s Another Academic Year!

Welcome back! The school year has started, so I’m resuming my weekly-ish blog posts. Looking forward to sharing lots of interesting things now that I’m tenured. Woot! Heads up–today’s post isn’t about my current life as a professor, but how I got started in higher education. Slightly different than my usual posts, but this isContinue reading “It’s Another Academic Year!”

Fighting for Shared Governance

On Friday, the Purdue Board of Trustees (BOT) approved a civics literacy requirement for all undergraduate students at Purdue campuses. For the past two weeks, I’ve worked along side my fellow colleagues in the AAUP to protest this vote. The faculty did not approve this requirement and the branch campuses received no notification or opportunityContinue reading “Fighting for Shared Governance”

The Proverbial Summer Break

The first time my mother suggested that I didn’t work in the summer because “you aren’t teaching a class,” I politely explained how academic life goes–that while no, I wasn’t teaching, I was still working, catching up on the various reviews and manuscripts and proposals that languish during the academic year. While I don’t ascribeContinue reading “The Proverbial Summer Break”

What I Read — April 2021

Despite reading over 1000 pages of student proposals/dissertations (which requires attention and commenting), I managed six books this month! A few comments… The book on money was super fascinating and I’d recommend it–very easy read. The authors have several other books as well that I plan to check out. I didn’t know much about TheContinue reading “What I Read — April 2021”

More Than Just Saying No: Why Academic Boundaries Matter

When I first started at Purdue in 2014, I was also training for my first marathon. This came up during a brief conversation with a colleague–I think he asked me how I was adjusting. Anyway, after I mentioned this, he looked at me somewhat sternly and said, “how do you have time as a newContinue reading “More Than Just Saying No: Why Academic Boundaries Matter”

What I Read — March 2021

April is affectionally dubbed “dissertation season.” Various deadlines of the graduate school makes April a busy month for proposal and dissertation defenses. Not sure how much I’ll be able to read outside of the *six* proposals/dissertations on my calendar this month. But I’ll try. I highly recommend each book this month. An Anonymous Girl isContinue reading “What I Read — March 2021”

Reflections on Classrooms as Counterspaces

Last week my latest publication, Classroom Counterspaces: Centering Brown and Black Students in Higher Education came out (50 free copies are available for download–if you want it and it’s not free anymore, let me know). In this article, I use the concepts of bridges and islands, which are drawn from Borderlands theory, to understand theContinue reading “Reflections on Classrooms as Counterspaces”

What I Read — February 2021

This was a slow reading month–although I did revise and resubmit two manuscripts and read two dissertations! Books Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972-1977 by Michel Foucault. Foucault’s work on discipline and surveillance is the center of one of my research projects. Black Feminist Thought by Patricia Hill Collins. Two of my projects drawContinue reading “What I Read — February 2021”