Why Teaching Sovereignty Matters

On July 9, 2020 the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 5-4 ruling in McGirt v.¬†Oklahoma, which held that under the Indian Major Crimes Act, lands reserved for the Creek Nation in eastern Oklahoma constituted Indian Country. This decision was a major win for Indigenous peoples in the U.S. Legal scholarship is not my area ofContinue reading “Why Teaching Sovereignty Matters”

The Fetishization of Historical Actors

As someone who studies how we talk about a particular type of history (Native/Indigenous) I wasn’t surprised when I found myself typing the following tweet: “All statues are is visual proof of the never-ending fetishization of single actors (which starts in elementary school, particularly the ‘founding fathers.’ they should all come down.” I deleted itContinue reading “The Fetishization of Historical Actors”

Understanding the Dominant Discourse of Colonialism: A Qualitative Single Case Study of an 8th Grade U.S. History Classroom

Masta, S. & Rosa, T. J. K. (2019). Understanding the dominant discourse of colonialism: A qualitative single case study of an 8th grade U.S. history classroom. The Social Studies, 110(3), 146-154. The purpose of this qualitative single case study is to investigate how teacher-created curricula addresses key Native American events in early US history andContinue reading “Understanding the Dominant Discourse of Colonialism: A Qualitative Single Case Study of an 8th Grade U.S. History Classroom”

Settler Colonial Legacies: Indigenous Student Reflections on K-12 Social Studies Curriculum

Masta, S. (2018). Settler colonial legacies: Indigenous student reflections on K-12 social studies curriculum. Intersections: Critical Issues in Education, 2(2), 76-88. This article explores how Indigenous students make meaning of the dominant structure of settler colonialism within their K-12 academic experiences. I build on previous work done on settler colonial ideology by linking structural formsContinue reading “Settler Colonial Legacies: Indigenous Student Reflections on K-12 Social Studies Curriculum”

Disrupting Colonial Narratives in the Curriculum

Masta, S. (2016). Disrupting colonial narratives in the curriculum. Multicultural Perspectives, 18(4), 185-191. Within the field of critical education studies scholars argue that social studies curriculum should address colonialism (Brayboy, 2006; Castagno & Brayboy, 2007; Tuck & Gatzambide-Fernandez, 2013). This article presents a single case study of an eighth-grade social studies teacher, and how vestigesContinue reading “Disrupting Colonial Narratives in the Curriculum”